Rocky’s Viewpoint

Rockys Viewpoint

A blog for people who treat their dogs better than family

For Rocky’s entire life and for a short time in Yankee’s life, I used the same retractable leash to walk them both. It seemed to make sense with Rocky who liked to wander and sniff more into the neighbors’ yards than I was willing to walk. Rocky was very low key, and not fazed by anything so walking on a retractable leash presented no real problems unless another dog approached.

Category: Exercise, Safety

On my recent annual vet visit, I discovered that my 8 year old dog Yankee’s thyroid is on the low side of normal, despite the fact that he doesn’t exhibit any of the typical symptoms.

Not of great concern, but because he doesn’t present known causes, I couldn’t understand why he might this might be happening until I learned about the potential problems with dog collars.

leash reactive dog staring

Leash aggression or leash reactivity as it’s also called is a behavior problem where the dog acts aggressively on leash toward other dogs, other animals, and sometimes people. I am intimately familiar with leash reactivity because Yankee exhibits this behavior (as did Rocky). He is fine off leash with most dogs, but when out walking, if he spots another dog, he initially starts by lying down, but then as the other dog gets close to us, he lunges.

Eddie swimming in the pool

As we have often said, we use ozone to sanitize the water in our indoor pool. Why is that? Because chlorine is toxic, it’s a poison that kills things like e. coli and giardia. In a pool you need something to kill bacteria and other germs and chlorine is the most popular choice because it’s inexpensive. Unfortunately, because it’s toxic, it has actually been linked to serious health problems in humans because it absorbs quickly through the skin.

Category: Industry News, Safety

As the seasons change, so do the conditions your dog is exposed to when participating in outdoor activities. We’re now going into our hot season so we need to be aware of the heat and how well your dog can tolerate these temperatures. If you’re prepared for the environment and know your limits, then you reduce the risk of health problems and injury.

Category: Exercise, Safety

Recently, I was speaking with a friend about how many people often overlook pets in their estate planning. A friend of ours had just passed away and I wondered what would happen to her pets. Most likely, I figured, her daughter would take them. But that’s not always the case.

Category: Safety

I think we have all finally learned that inhaling second-hand smoke is just as bad as smoking.

The State of Colorado and Connecticut Departments of Public Health conducted studies and found that second hand smoke is greatly associated with nasal sinus cancer and linked to lung cancer in dogs. The incidence of nasal cavity tumors in dogs that were exposed to second-hand smoke was higher than dogs that lived in households with non-smoking members.

You may or may not know this, but we spent a year researching what type of sanitation system we wanted to use in our aqua therapy center. We instinctively knew chlorine was very bad, and never considered it. We briefly considered bromine, a chlorine substitute, but again, it has many of the same harmful effects as chlorine. Then we looked at salt, but felt it would be too drying to both our skin and to the dog’s skin.

If your dog is lost, what is the probability that he will be found and returned to you? Not sure – it depends on the circumstances.

Most of us have ID tags on our dog’s collar but it’s been my experience especially in my neighborhood that most dogs get out after having had a bath and have no collar on.

Category: Safety

In my neighborhood there are lots of people out daily walking their dogs. I live in a residential area where often cars cut through to get to nearby streets, sometime at excessive speeds. It’s obvious to most people then that anyone walking their dog needs to have the dog on leash to prevent a possible accident. There are other good reasons to keep a dog on leash, such as to keep him from getting into something you don’t want him to, or to keep him from chasing the neighborhood cat.

Category: Safety